Mold

mold

What is mold?

Molds are a form of fungus. There are many different types, and they can occur both indoors and outdoors.

Molds produce spores, which spread by floating around in the air. Mold spores are present in all indoor environments. There is no way to prevent spores, and they can persist in conditions where mold itself cannot grow.

Mold spores thrive in environments that are moist and warm, so when they land on a damp spot, they begin to grow.

Molds can grow on a variety of different surfaces, including fabric, paper, wood, glass, and plastic. As they grow, they may digest the material they are growing on.

Types of mold

Nobody knows how many kinds of mold there are, but experts estimate that there may be 300,000 or more different types. Some are more likely than others to appear in the home.

Common indoor molds include:

Alternaria: This occurs in damp places indoors, such as showers or under leaky sinks.

Aspergillus: This often grows indoors, on dust, powdery food items, and building materials, such as drywall.

Cladosporium: This can grow in either cool or warm areas. It tends to appear on fabrics and wood surfaces.

Penicillium: This tends to grow on materials with water damage. It often has a blue or green appearance.

Molds take a variety of forms and textures. They can be white, black, yellow, blue, or green and often look like discoloration or stain to a surface.

They can also have a velvety, fuzzy, or rough appearance, depending on the type of mold and where it is growing.

How does mold get into a house?

Mold spores are everywhere, both indoors and outdoors, but they are not visible to the naked eye.

Spores can enter the home:

Through the air: They can enter through open windows, doorways, and ventilation systems.

By attaching to objects or people: Vehicles include clothing, shoes, and pets.

Places where mold often appears include:

  • areas where leakages and flooding have occurred
  • windows where condensation builds up
  • places where the air does not circulate, for example, behind a closet

Wet cellulose materials are most supportive of mold growth.

Mold Testing

If you have mold in your home, your nose is one of the most inexpensive devises you can use to detect it. Mold smells, and chances are, you’ll be able to detect the distinctive odor that taints the air around moldy walls, carpeting and other objects. The struggle is in understanding when mold is dangerous to your family or home.